World-Architects Daily News

      

Tuesday, May 03, 2016

Today's archidose #900

Here are some photos of the Waterliniemuseum (2015) in Bunnik, Netherlands, by Rapp+Rapp in collaboration with West 8 and Jonathan Penne Architecten. (Photographs: Klaas Vermaas)





To contribute your Flickr images for consideration, just:
:: Join and add photos to the archidose pool
To contribute your Instagram images for consideration, just:
:: Tag your photos #archidose

Monday, May 02, 2016

Manus x Machina

Here's a quick tour through the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute's "Manus x Machina" exhibition that opens to the public on May 5th. While the treat for most people will be taking in the fashion on display, which veers between the handmade (Manus) to the computer-made (Machina), my photographs from today's press preview focus on the exhibition design by OMA's New York office.

The exhibition, located on two levels in the Met's Robert Lehman Wing, is reached via the Medieval Sculpture Hall, which OMA partner Shohei Shigematsu described as having a "church-like atmosphere":
Manus x Machina

Following the long strip of carpet, one comes to an arched opening signaling the exhibition, "Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology":
Manus x Machina

There are three choices after walking through the opening: 1) Turn left or right to follow the corridors and look at niches filled with dresses:
Manus x Machina

2) Go downstairs to the lower level, where most of the dresses are found, or 3) walk straight ahead to look at the central space with its solitary dress (most people will opt for #3):
Manus x Machina

This central space, what Shigematsu calls a "ghost cathedral" in reference to the Medieval Sculpture Hall, features a brand new, yet temporary floor inserted into the Lehman Wing. In the center of the space sits a wedding dress designed by Karl Lagerfeld with a handmade front and laser-cut train (note the niche visible through the translucent wall):
Manus x Machina

The dome above the dress (below the Wing's blacked-out glass pyramid skylight) features a kaleidoscopic image of the dress's train:
Manus x Machina

Here is a view from a side portal that shows a little bit of the dome above the walls:
Manus x Machina

The walls of the exhibition are made from perforated PVC scrim, a material often used in theater. The scaffolding structure that holds up the scrim panels are revealed through varying degrees of translucency as one moves through the space. Here one of the pochéd niches can be seen from behind:
Manus x Machina

More translucent materials and basic support structure is visible when descending to the lower level, the actual level of the Lehman Wing:
Manus x Machina

The steps from above converge at a couple spots on the lower level, where some unique dresses – both handmade and computer-made – are highlighted:
Manus x Machina
Manus x Machina
Manus x Machina

The displays downstairs basically follow the existing layout, except scrims are introduced for continuity:
Manus x Machina

A gallery space where OMA's design intervention is minimal:
Manus x Machina

One of the few fashion details I photographed, a 3D-printed dress (sorry, I failed to note the designer):
Manus x Machina

Lastly, an easy-to-miss detail is OMA's credit line on a wall near the entry upstairs (the text for the main sponsor, Apple, on another wall is harder to miss):
Manus x Machina

Friday, April 29, 2016

Book Review: Eco Living Japan

Eco Living Japan: Sustainable Ideas for Living Green by Deanna MacDonald
Tuttle Publishing, 2015
Hardcover, 240 pages



When I think of Tuttle, I think of Japan – and vice versa to a lesser degree. Be it gardens, tea or, in this case, houses, the publisher has a knack for capturing the intrinsic qualities of Japanese culture and disseminating it to a wider audience. Eco Living Japan, by Temple University professor Deanna MacDonald (she teaches at their Tokyo campus), has compiled 20 houses that, while contemporary, exhibit many of the traits that people associate with traditional Japanese architecture; the cover house, for instance, looks like it is wrapped entirely by shoji screens, glowing like a lantern in the snow. (The project, designed by Kengo Kuma, is actually wrapped in polycarbonate with polyester insulation.)

MacDonald's collection of green living in Japan and beyond is broken down into five chapters: Borrowed Landscapes; Reinventing Tradition; 'Smart' Green; Reuse, Renew, Recycle, Renovate; and Sustainable Japan Abroad. These thematic chapters move from the traditional to the contemporary, from the way Japanese designers have traditionally brought nature into the smallest of houses and gardens, to the way their ethos has been absorbed in other places recently. Accompanying the projects in each chapter are sidebars on some recurring elements (engawa spaces, prefab, charred wood siding, etc.) that further link the new houses with old traditions.

Over the years I've reviewed numerous books on (small) Japanese houses and gardens, but even with exposure from those books and the many websites that champion the same, many of the houses in this book are new to me. Credit goes to MacDonald for sticking to the theme of "eco living," rather than compiling the latest and greatest, and therefore finding houses with positive green attributes. Key words at the end of each project highlight what these attributes are, giving readers an easy way of cross-referencing the designs and finding what qualities they most admire. The success of her book would be greatest if, like the last chapter, people reading the book absorbed its ides of eco living and incorporated them into their own living spaces, wherever they may be.

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Today's archidose #899

Here are some photos of Sky Habitat (2016) in Singapore by Safdie Architects. (Photographs: Trevor Patt)

IMG_0005
IMG_0013
IMG_9907
IMG_9979
IMG_9953
IMG_9972
IMG_9930
IMG_9960
IMG_9924

To contribute your Flickr images for consideration, just:
:: Join and add photos to the archidose pool
To contribute your Instagram images for consideration, just:
:: Tag your photos #archidose

Friday, April 22, 2016

10 Towns that Changed America

On Tuesday PBS aired the last of three new episodes in the "10 that Changed America" series by Chicago's Geoffrey Baer. Watch 10 Towns that Changed America below.



Previously: 10 Homes that Changed America, 10 Parks that Changed America

Thursday, April 21, 2016

Today's archidose #898

Here are some photos of the Sports and Rehabilitation Center of the Medical University of Warsaw in Warsaw, Poland, by Kontrapunkt Architecture in collaboration with AI Architects Cyprus. (Photographs: Piotr Krajewski)








To contribute your Flickr images for consideration, just:
:: Join and add photos to the archidose pool
To contribute your Instagram images for consideration, just:
:: Tag your photos #archidose

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Ford Foundation's New Atrium Garden

New York YIMBY reports the good news that "on Tuesday, the Landmarks Preservation Commission approved changes to the atrium of the Ford Foundation Building at 320 East 43rd Street." Gensler is overseeing the upgrades to the 1967 building designed by Kevin Roche and John Dinkeloo, which address code and accessibility issues. Since the needed "asbestos abatement requires the removal of all living things," according to Alexandra Lange at Curbed, the famous one-third-acre atrium garden designed by Dan Kiley will be replanted. Miami's Raymond Jungles is in charge of that work, and here are some existing and proposed views of the atrium garden. (Images are via YIMBY; click any image to view as a slideshow, recommended).

Existing:

Proposed:


Existing:

Proposed:


Existing:

Proposed:


Comparison of the before and after views shows more trees and low plantings in the latter, which should enable more visibility across the terraced atrium. This is aligned with the intention of bringing the atrium garden closer to what Kiley originally intended. In developing his design, Kiley told the Ford Foundation frankly it would be an experiment, and in turn many of the plantings failed, leading eventually to the current dense crop of trees and plants. These images (also via YIMBY) illustrate how Jungles will transform the garden into something aligned with Kiley's original design:





Upgrades are expected to be completed in 2018. In the meantime, visit YIMBY for the full LPC Submission.

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Book of the Moment: Toilets: A Spotter's Guide

Yes, the title of a brand new book from Lonely Planet is Toilets: A Spotter's Guide, which appends the phrase: "Nature's call has never been so beautifully answered."



Although it's been a while since I've posted about toilets (or 23-foot-high toilets or books printed on toilet paper), yet I still contend that the quality of a building can be gleamed from how well the bathrooms were designed. If the below sample pages are any indication, the toilets in the spotter's guide are all about standalone structures and are as much about where they're found as what they look like.



Book description from Lonely Planet:
Loos with incredible views, lavish lavatories, outstanding outhouses ­ all are featured in this pictorial guide to the world's most stunning toilets. Whether they're high­tech or arty, amusing or amazing, each toilet has a photo and a description of its location. More than 100 restrooms to remember are featured, from Antarctica to Zambia.

As any experienced traveller knows, you can tell a whole lot about a place by its bathrooms. Whatever you prefer to call them – lavatory, loo, bog, khasi, thunderbox, dunny, bathroom, restroom, washroom or water closet – toilets are a (sometimes opaque, often wide­open) window into the secret soul of a destination.

In these pages you’ll find porcelain pews with fantastic views, audacious attention­seeking urban outhouses, and eco­thrones made from sticks and stones in all sorts of wild settings, from precipitous mountain peaks to dusty deserts. So, wherever you’re reading this, we hope you’re sitting comfortably.

Monday, April 18, 2016

Today's archidose #897

Here are some photos of the Pedras Salgadas Eco-Resort (2012) in Pedras Salgadas, Portugal, by Rebelo de Andrade Studio and Diogo Aguiar. (Photographs: José Carlos Melo Dias)

Modular prefab cabins by Luís Rebelo de Andrade and Diogo Aguiar:
Pedras Salgadas, Eco Houses. Luís Rebelo de Andrade + Tiago Rebelo de Andrade
Pedras Salgadas, Eco Houses. Luís Rebelo de Andrade + Tiago Rebelo de Andrade

Tree Snake Houses by Luís Rebelo de Andrade and Tiago Rebelo de Andrade:
Pedras Salgadas,  "Casas nas árvores". Luís Rebelo de Andrade + Tiago Rebelo de Andrade
Pedras Salgadas,  "Casas nas árvores". Luís Rebelo de Andrade + Tiago Rebelo de Andrade

To contribute your Flickr images for consideration, just:
:: Join and add photos to the archidose pool
To contribute your Instagram images for consideration, just:
:: Tag your photos #archidose